A film about “Emily” and how to juggle work-life balance issues!

http://www.wpradio.co.uk
Women’s Parliamentary Radio
March 1st 2011

http://www.wpradio.co.uk – a new film of the life of the Suffragette Emily Wilding Davison and juggling work-life balance even a small “tweak” will make a big difference

http://www.wpradio.co.uk is broadcasting two new podcast broadcasts – we take a trip back in time to the life of the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison and we talk to a life-coach on how women MPs and those who take up “vocations” can juggle work-life balance.

A film of the life of “Emily” – Emily Wilding Davison:

Film Producer Joan Lane of WildThyme Productions Ltd http://www.wildthymeproductions.com and script writer and producer Barbara Gorna are making a film of the life of the suffragette Emily Wilding Davison, who became a martyr to the cause of women’s votes when she was fatally injured in the 1913 Epsom Derby. She ran onto the track in support of the women’s right to vote campaign and was knocked over by the King’s horse but as this film reveals for the first time “Emily” did not commit suicide, her death was an accident.

The scarf “Emily” wore when she was knocked down is on loan to the House of Commons from Barbara and forms part of a small display near Central Lobby Westminster called “Parliament and Votes for Women”. “Emily” also hid herself in a broom cupboard in the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft, in the crypt of St Stephen’s Hall, on the night of the census on 2nd April 1911. It will be 100 years on 27th March 2011, the date of the next census, since she did this.

Joan kick started the script for the King’s Speech and like that film script “Emily” resonated with Joan, whose father’s family come from Morpeth, where “Emily” is now buried. Our Executive Producer, Boni Sones OBE, spoke to Joan and Barbara as they stood under the “Emily” scarf and progressed to Central Lobby.
Barbara told Boni:

• “The scarf has become a totem for the women’s movement worldwide as Emily attempted to put it on the Kings horse in 1913, but she was knocked down by the horse and died four days later.”
• “She was imprisoned eight times, and she went on hunger strike together with the others, and they were force fed, which was a nasty treatment, it was a government approved torture.”
• “Several things have come to light in our research. Joan and I have been working on it for about nine months, and we have looked at things like where “Emily” gets her anger from, and we think some of her personal anger came from her family circumstances.”
• “It’s been a very interesting journey. The scarf was in my possession before it was in the Commons. There is a great presence about the scarf, and I often feel there is someone standing over my shoulder telling me what I should do. I have become very immersed in “Emily’s” character and I think with Joan I have got it right.”

Joan told Boni:

• “”Emily” ducks underneath the barrier, and waits until the Kings horse is approaching and attempts to drape the scarf over the horse, and being knocked to the ground she suffered fatal injuries when the horse kicked her. As to suicide, it is very unlikely; she had brought a return ticket. It is not a way you would commit suicide, it is a very suspect reason for her being at the races.”
• “The stage play of the script of the Kings Speech arrived on my desk in January 2006 and I tried very hard to get a stage play and production mounted, deeming it worthy of big attention, and I showed the script to some film colleagues at Bedlam films. They took an option on it and I was able to help them kick-start it, with a reading of it too.”
• “When the script for “Emily” arrived on my desk it resonated with me as the Kings Speech had resonated with me for personal reasons. I had been a speech and language therapist and had also met the Queen Mother on several occasions. With “Emily” my father’s family came from Morpeth where she is now buried and I have been to that Church many times.”
• “Barbara has done a marvellous job on the screenplay. I am a little angry that young women don’t always go to vote knowing of this historical story. I don’t think young women know how women suffered to get the vote and perhaps with the film more young women will go out to vote. It is a story for women worldwide.”

Barbara’s short documentary film of Emily’s life can be viewed on http://www.wpradio.co.uk/facetofacevideos.html

How to juggle work-life balance: Does a “vocation” stop you taking a much needed break?

“A healthy selfishness” might just help us all juggle that “Work- life balance” question says Caroline Lloyd-Evans, coach, counsellor and relationship therapist. Here Caroline tells Boni Sones OBE, our Executive Producer how women have to work harder, compete harder and climb over their own complexes to navigate that obstacle course to achieve balance. “Tweaking a little” can make a big difference. Do listen, this advice is clear! http://www.cleconsulting.co.uk.

• “A healthy selfishness – I used to say you need to be self-aware, and women are more self-aware. We are much more honest and aware to start-with but we then have to work out how to apply it to ourselves and we have to look at our body and our mind and how we feel and how “in balance” we are. We then need to be practical to all the calls upon our time, because they are enormous.”

• “Women are always queried, women have to work harder and compete harder and climb over their own complexes, because they are tougher on themselves. If women love what they are doing, it is harder to get a decent balance between their work-life balance. It is like an obstacle course, if you put too much into your work your home-life might suffer and vice-versa. Helping people to say “no” is important, and working out how to get yourself support. Women are terrible at thinking they have to do everything.”

• “Westminster is about conflict – you notice it is always military phrases like “battles”. Parliament is about being challenging and confrontational but once you point a finger at somebody else you can hurt yourself, it can come back to yourself and make you feel quit uncomfortable particularly the more sensitive side of yourself.”

• “Healthy selfishness – you need to listen to your own body, and know that you can snap unless you do something to relieve the stress like taking a break or going to a class of some kind. You need to think “is this worth getting upset about?”. MPs see so many serious situations, it ought to help them to say we can “lower the temperature” and take a break when needed.”

• “We can tweak the obstacles, remove them, but those small differences we make for instance to relax a bit or step up a bit, it’s a bit like DIY, if you do something a little bit different it can make the stress get better. It’s about being more honest with yourself, if you keep pushing yourself, for instance drinking too much, not getting enough sleep, what use are you to others? You just have to start being more aware of yourself and know yourself better.”

Footnotes:
1. Wpradio.co.uk is a web based broadcaster supported by all parties. Latest web stats show that in May 2010 we had our highest audience ever with 3,913 visitors, there were over 1,000 more visitors in June and July too compared to last year and even August increased. We don’t share our content with others in order to inflate our stats, you have to visit our website to listen to our content.

2. Our web stats show that our visitors are loyal, they return, tune in for some time and to more than one item. We have doubled our audience in a year. In July we published our Top Ten podcasts for that month. The top 8 all had over 100 downloads per podcast. Shirley Williams is hugely popular with 777 listeners to one podcast! The Oona King diaries are proving popular too.

3. wpradio also carries international content and has interviews with women MEPs in Europe, and women politicians in Africa and the Middle East.

4. Our supporters include Theresa May MP, Jo Swinson MP, Harriet Harman MP,and many other female politicians listed on our site. Jackie Ashley, of the Guardian, is our Chair.

5. The British Library archives all the interviews on wpradio.co.uk in its new web collection.

6. For more information contact Boni Sones OBE on 07703 716961.
End.

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www.wpradio.co.uk teams up with VSO and the UN “Godmothers”

http://www.wpradio.co.uk
Women’s Parliamentary Radio

February 22nd 2011
For immediate release
http://www.wpradio.co.uk teams up with VSO and the UN “Godmothers” to hear how activists are challenging their local MPs to support the new UN Agency for Women

http://www.wpradio.co.uk VSO UN “Godmothers” documentary presented from Central Lobby, Westminster

1,500 women are dying a day in childbirth. Forced marriages, rape, violence, poverty, equal pay: Michelle Bachelet’s new UN Agency for Women has some vocal supporters in the UK who want to ensure it gets the funding it needs to make a difference. To make sure that happens, VSO has just launched the ‘Godmothers’ campaign http://www.thegodmothers.org.uk which calls on DFID to become a leading donor to UN Women by making a financial contribution of around 21 million dollars.

In this special Two Part 50 minute UN “Godmothers” documentary our Executive Producer Boni Sones OBE, caught up with Sharon Hodgson MP, campaigners themselves, and Anas Sarwar MP, as activists met their MPs in Central Lobby, Westminster.

Sharon Hodgson the Labour MP for Washington and Sunderland West told Boni:

• “It will be a talking shop if it has no money to do anything with, other Countries have started to put up the money, Spain has put up £13 million, Australia £8 million and when I asked Andrew Mitchell, the International Development Secretary, what the UK government was going to do he said they were going to have a strategy review in June and they would look at it after that. We need this money now if not the UN Agency for Women will be a talking shop.”
• “There are many major issues that need confronting on behalf of women and we really need the UN Women to have some teeth to say what is acceptable and what isn’t and for the UK government to back that.”
• “We hear about landmarks but at this point in time with all of the changes in the World, the Middle East, Egypt and other revolutions, I think the UN Agency for Women can be a real revolution for women across the developing World.”

Anas Sarwar the Labour MP for Glasgow Central, who sits on the International Development Select Committee, told Boni:

• “More than three-quarters of the poorest one billion people in the World today are women. Women have to be at the heart of our development strategy as a Country and that is why I support the UN Agency for Women and that is why the UK has to commit to it.”
• “Some of the greatest challenges we face in the developing world is to champion the role of women on issues such as access to education, violence against women, land ownership, women’s representation, all of which will be championed by the new UN Agency. Spain has committed £13 million but the UK hasn’t committed a single penny to this new Agency and we need to lead from the front. I will press the Secretary of State, Andrew Mitchell on this.”
• “My constituents are natural internationalists; ordinary hard working people give generously to global disasters, even in the most difficult times. What people want is peace, prosperity and justice for every man woman and child throughout the World, and we as the UK most show leadership on this new UN Agency for women. We need to lead from the front on development.”

In Part 2 of UN “Godmothers” Boni talks to Lesley Abdela of Shevolution while she chatted with activists in Central Lobby.

Lesley Abdela told Boni:

• “The “Godmothers” has been set up to keep an eye on the British government and the UN Agency for women to make it work. This VSO initiative embraces a variety of supporters, ordinary people and organisations such as the WI. They want DFID to invest £21 million dollars, the same as it gives to UNICEF, a relatively modest amount.”
• “What I have seen time after time after time, women are in the front of campaigning for democracy, peace and progress but the moment it gets formalised they are pushed out. We are not where it matters at the top table; we are not opening the doors for women enough. In the Middle East talks for instance, there should be equal numbers of women.”
• “We are not asking for extra money into DFIDs budget, but for something like 0.2 per cent of DFIDs budget to be allocated to this. We either go full tilt and set up UN Women for success or why bother to do it at all?”

Footnotes:
1. Wpradio.co.uk is a web based broadcaster supported by all parties. Latest web stats show that in May 2010 we had our highest audience ever with 3,913 visitors, there were over 1,000 more visitors in June and July too compared to last year and even August increased. We don’t share our content with others in order to inflate our stats, you have to visit our website to listen to our content.

2. Our web stats show that our visitors are loyal, they return, tune in for some time and to more than one item. We have doubled our audience in a year. In July we published our Top Ten podcasts for that month. The top 8 all had over 100 downloads per podcast. Shirley Williams is hugely popular with 777 listeners to one podcast! The Oona King diaries are proving popular too.

3. wpradio also carries international content and has interviews with women MEPs in Europe, and women politicians in Africa and the Middle East.

4. Our supporters include Theresa May MP, Jo Swinson MP, Harriet Harman MP,and many other female politicians listed on our site. Jackie Ashley, of the Guardian, is our Chair.

5. The British Library archives all the interviews on wpradio.co.uk in its new web collection.

6. For more information contact Boni Sones OBE on 07703 716961.
End.

www.wpradio looks at post natal depression and empowerment

PRESS RELEASE
http://www.wpradio.co.uk
Women’s Parliamentary Radio

February 18th 2011
For immediate release

Www.wpradio.co.uk looks at how one Conservative MP is tackling an issue she’s passionate about through the Big Society, and we talk to a Peer about how she thinks investment in business is the right approach to women’s empowerment in India and Africa


Infant Early Attachment and The Big Society
Andrea Leadsom MP talks to Linda Fairbrother

One in ten mums suffer from post-natal depression. Now Andrea Leadsom the Conservative MP for South Northamptonshire is taking an issue close to her heart to launch a Northampton charitable venture, with patrons, donors and volunteers to provide perinatal mental health care for mothers and their babies. Andrea had a 25 career in banking and finance, and was a Trustee and Chairman of the children’s charity OXPIP ((the Oxford Parent-Infant Project), which offers intensive therapeutic help to parents and their babies in the first two years of life.

Andrea, who suffered from post-natal depression herself, believes that many of the problems our society faces can be traced back to poor early attachment. She’s already held a Westminster Hall Debate on Early Attachment and says her campaign to mainstream this issue into social policy has cross-party support. Andrea thinks that if her Big Society launch of the new Northamptonshire project is a success it could be a template to “role out” across Britain. She’s not contemplating failure despite the public sector cut-backs!
Andrea told Linda:

• “Early infant attachment really is my passion. In 2001 I had two children and was quite postnatally depressed after having had my first child. I had worked in a senior role in banking and was experiencing this radical change but I had a supportive family and health visitor and I went back to work and that snapped me out of it.”
• “One in ten mums suffer from post natal depression, and some families have far worse problems where the relationship with the baby suffers massively as a consequence.”
• “Between six and 18 months the baby experiences a massive growth of the frontal cortex, the part of the brain that is not there when you are born and that grows as a result of a loving relationship. It is the social and empathetic part of the brain and it enables you to have the resilience to the things life throws at you and to meet disappointments. These pathways are laid down by the age of 2.”
• “The cycle of deprivation is the key to this, if you didn’t form a secure attachment when you were small that pattern is repeated and it becomes a cycle of deprivation that gets worse as you go down the generations.”
• “OXPIP – I was chairman from 2001 to 2009. We take referrals from families themselves, from health visitors, midwives and GPs and our therapists work with the family to help the mother to understand her fears and depression. It is a talking therapy and the results are astonishing, there is a once a week session, it’s very cheap £75 a week, versus the cost of a child on the child protection list and versus the cost of a chid that doesn’t form that early attachment in life.”
• “A number of front bench ministers are aware of the early attachment issue such as Iain Duncan Smith, and other MPs across party too like Graham Alan’s review on early intervention, and Frank Field. We want Sure Start children’s centres to provide perinatal mental health support services. In 2011 I am trying to launch a Northamptonshire parent infant project, working closely with the Director of Children’s Services there.”
• “I am hoping to start this Northamptonshire charity, with donors, volunteers and trustees to work with professionals from OXPIP, to document it as a template to roll this out across the country. I want to prove the value of it and to try and role it out nationally. Spending money on early prevention is a saving.”
• “From a hard headed financial point of view you would save a fortune by investing in early intervention. I am hoping that by the time we can look at a government role out the economic tide will be turning and certainly I am a huge fan of the Big Society and improving volunteering and this is a perfect example of how people can get involved in making the community around them a better place. This is not a party political issue.”

Linda Fairbrother meets: “The movers and shakers”
Baroness Shreela Flather, “Woman: Acceptable exploitation for Profit”.

Baroness Shreela Flather, the first Asian woman to receive a peerage, and known for wearing a sari, says her book “Woman: Acceptable exploitation for Profit” is meant to “tread” on a few toes by tackling the great taboo of children working for a living and the role of women in India and Africa. http://www.amazon.co.uk/Woman-Acceptable-Expoitation-Shreela-Flather/dp/1849950024

Baroness Flather says the United National Millennium Development Goals will not be met by the target date of 2015 and that only by shifting the focus to women themselves and enabling them through small business, technology and income generation can real progress be made. Family planning and education are key to harnessing their talents. Our http://www.wpradio.co.uk reporter Linda Fairbrother spoke to her.

“This House would not get Married!” – A Valentine’s day http://www.wpradio.co.uk Cambridge Union Society “partnership”

To celebrate Valentine’s Day http://www.wpradio.co.uk went to the Cambridge Union Debate “This House would not get Married”. Here William Longrigg, Partner at Charles Russell and President of the International Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and Winston Preece, a Cambridge student, speak in favour of the motion while our Advisory Board Member Anastasia de Waal, Deputy Director and Head of Family Policy at Civitas and Anne Atkins, Author, Journalist, Agony Aunt and supporter of Christian values speak against. The Debate was Chaired by Francesca Hill, of Trinity Hall. http://www.cus.org will tell you who won!!

Ugandan elections and the voice of an 81-year-old activist – Rhoda Kalema

Ugandans hold their presidential and parliamentary elections on February 18th. This election is just the second since 1986 in which opposition parties have been legally permitted to campaign and it has been relatively free of violence to date. But there are concerns about how public funds are being used, particularly to support the campaigns of the ruling National Resistance Movement, led by President Yoweri Museveni. President Museveni came to power in 1986, following a protracted rebellion. Here in this special interview from our archives Rhoda Kalema, the “Mother” of the Ugandan Parliament tells her story of imprisonment in Uganda before going on to become an MP herself and helping to set up a Commission to help women and their families. She talked to Boni Sones OBE.

A documentary from Rhoda’s book:”A Rising Tide”, made in conjunction with http://www.screen-space.co.uk which tells the histories of modern women politicians there from the 1940s through to the present time can be found on our International Section
Good luck Rhoda.

Footnotes:
1. Wpradio.co.uk is a web based broadcaster supported by all parties. Latest web stats show that in May 2010 we had our highest audience ever with 3,913 visitors, there were over 1,000 more visitors in June and July too compared to last year and even August increased. We don’t share our content with others in order to inflate our stats, you have to visit our website to listen to our content.

2. Our web stats show that our visitors are loyal, they return, tune in for some time and to more than one item. We have doubled our audience in a year. In July we published our Top Ten podcasts for that month. The top 8 all had over 100 downloads per podcast. Shirley Williams is hugely popular with 777 listeners to one podcast! The Oona King diaries are proving popular too.

3. wpradio also carries international content and has interviews with women MEPs in Europe, and women politicians in Africa and the Middle East.

4. Our supporters include Theresa May MP, Jo Swinson MP, Harriet Harman MP,and many other female politicians listed on our site. Jackie Ashley, of the Guardian, is our Chair.

5. The British Library archives all the interviews on wpradio.co.uk in its new web collection.

6. For more information contact Boni Sones OBE on 07703 716961.
End.

End.

Ann Treneman talks to Caroline Lucas MP/Jo Swinson MP in South Africa

PRESS RELEASE
http://www.wpradio.co.uk
Women’s Parliamentary Radio

February 4th 2011
For immediate release

http://www.wpradio.co.uk Ann Treneman, The Times sketchwriter, has a “Face to Face Encounter” with Caroline Lucas MP on her Parliamentary Reforms and “Guest Editor” Jo Swinson MP hooks up with South Africa and one woman MP’s battle to end violence against women

Ann Treneman “Face to Face Encounters” series.

Ann Treneman, sketchwriter of The Times starts off our new “Face to Face Encounters” series of interviews talking with Caroline Lucas, MP for Brighton Pavilion and Leader of the Green Party on her proposals for the reform of Parliament.

Caroline’s report “The Case for Parliamentary Reform” has just been debated in Westminster Hall. It includes measures for “electronic voting”, changing “the parliamentary language”, ending the “talking out” of Private Members Bills, and publication of the “Speakers List” so MPs know when they are going to be called to talk in the Chamber.

Caroline, an MEP for ten years, estimates that just queuing up to vote accounts for around £30,000 a week in MPs’ salary costs, and 250 hours of their time each Parliamentary year. Here Ann – renowned for her portrayals of Westminster as a series of “playground spats” between “bickering children” – finds out if Caroline is a modern day “Mary Poppins” and destined to fail?

Caroline tells Ann:

• “The culture is an old boy’s club, that is the feel of it. One of the reasons I hold out some hope – because I do appreciate others have tried to reform Westminster – is that there are a lot of new MPs from professional backgrounds who are still reeling in shock about how this place works. I hope these voices get heard, because there really is quite a groundswell for saying there are things we could do, fairly simply, to make this place operate more efficiently.”

• “The Speakers List suggestions, some are for and some are against! There is a worry that fewer people will be in the Chamber, but there are safeguards you can build into this, so you keep the spontaneity but you wouldn’t have the situation where you sit through say six hours of debate, not being able to go to the loo, in case you lose your position on the list, if you knew you were on it. It’s like Alice in Wonderland.”

• “….it does feel like a little island of madness, I agree with you, it is a very different World. I think the work home-life balance is so difficult, ask my two kids, anyone with a responsibility for kids particularly young kids has a real struggle, particularly for the all-night sittings. That mystery you speak of, because you don’t know when things are going to happen, does make operating here incredibly difficult.”

• “There has been less opposition than I thought, things are changing it is exciting to be here, and there has been less old style patronage than I had expected. I do just get the sense there is an appetite for some change, but maybe over optimistically.”

• “I am not expecting this is all going to go through swimmingly first time round, but it does just open the doors for other people’s ideas and I hope that we can get some momentum behind them. Some of them that are easy wins, like some explanation of what an amendment is trying to achieve, that is not revolutionary and it would mean that more MPs would know what they are voting on, the Whips power would be less, and somebody trying to follow this from the outside would understand what is going on here.”

Jo Swinson MP “Guest Editor” and Lindiwe Mazibuko, MP South African Parliament

Jo Swinson the Liberal Democrat MP for East Dunbartonshire, PPS to Business Secretary Vince Cable, sits in our http://www.wpradio.co.uk “Guest Editor” Chair this week. She recently meet Lindiwe Mazibuko, the opposition Democratic Alliance Spokesperson in the South African Parliament and the Shadow Deputy Minister of Communications. Lindiwe is one of the Parliaments youngest members, as was Jo herself.

In this special “hook-up” to celebrate 100 years of International Women’s Day in March 2011, Jo asks Lindiwe about how she was elected and what the impact of apartheid and the ANCs 1996 Constitution has been? Lindiwe told Jo how the women in the Parliament were progressing the pressing issue of young women being kidnapped and raped as some sort of marriage courtship practice, and to stop women being treated as “objects” culturally. Here Jo is co-founder of “The Campaign for Body Confidence”.

Lindiwe told Jo:
• “I was elected in 2009 in the last General Election for the Democratic Alliance, we have a full PR list system and I was number three on the list. I had been working for the Party the Democratic Alliance for some time, they were looking for people who were competent and diverse and who could represent a better mix of South African’s and as a young politician I made the cut. The Party was looking to diversify and I was ready and waiting.”

• Almost half of the MPs in the National Assembly are women and the same is true of the ANC’s Cabinet, almost half of them are women. In the governing party certain positions are sometimes reserved for women and some for men but in our Party it is a far more open approach and we have a female leader. Women’s issues are everyone’s issues is our approach, the challenges that face women in South Africa stem from the rich culture of patriarchy. The representation doesn’t always translate into as much activism as it should.”

• “Politician’s are quick to make glib speeches but it is not always translated into policy implementation for instance on the issues such as polygamy, we have never made a serious issue about this. Women are still having to subscribe to a patriarchal society even when half the women in the Cabinet are women. “

• “Issues of poverty such as HIV, Aids and sexual violence are of importance too, the rate of infection is much higher amongst women than men, particularly young women. One survey found a third of men admitted to committing sexual violence against a woman, figures like this are astonishing. Women as objects that have to be treated like a child or as a possession is something that stems from the deep patriarchy which was part of apartheid and there is a little bit of a time warp here. In deep rural parts of the Country the most astonishing practices still take place like women being kidnapped and raped as part of some pre marriage courtship practices. People are frightened to champion women as equals. ”

• “We in the DA are trying to convince South African’s our rights in the Constitution are only of value if we are willing to protect each other, and someone who doesn’t come from my racial or cultural group. It is such a difficult process because the scars of apartheid are deep and longstanding, and the hope is coming from young people and young leaders. It is difficult to break that racial deadlock, but we are working as hard as we can to make that happen.”

• “We need our partners in Parliament’s all over the World to fight the fight with us to fight the culture of patriarchy and attitudes surrounding women, and others must be willing to discuss the challenges we face. To celebrate 100 years of International Women’s Day it would be good if we could join hands with women in other Parliament’s where women are more emancipated in order to give us a bit more momentum too.”

• Footnotes:
1. Wpradio.co.uk is a web based broadcaster supported by all parties. Latest web stats show that in May 2010 we had our highest audience ever with 3,913 visitors, there were over 1,000 more visitors in June and July too compared to last year and even August increased. We don’t share our content with others in order to inflate our stats, you have to visit our website to listen to our content.

2. Our web stats show that our visitors are loyal, they return, tune in for some time and to more than one item. We have doubled our audience in a year. In July we published our Top Ten podcasts for that month. The top 8 all had over 100 downloads per podcast. Shirley Williams is hugely popular with 777 listeners to one podcast! The Oona King diaries are proving popular too.

3. wpradio also carries international content and has interviews with women MEPs in Europe, and women politicians in Africa and the Middle East.

4. Our supporters include Theresa May MP, Jo Swinson MP, Harriet Harman MP,and many other female politicians listed on our site. Jackie Ashley, of the Guardian, is our Chair.

5. The British Library archives all the interviews on wpradio.co.uk in its new web collection.

6. For more information contact Boni Sones OBE on 07703 716961.
End.